Current Season

2017 – 2018 Season

The Addams Family Musical
Directed by Heather May
Musical Direction by:  TBA
October 5-8, 12-15, 2017
Musical Comedy
Music and Lyrics by Andrew Lippa.
Book by Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice

THE ADDAMS FAMILY features an original story, and it’s every father’s nightmare. Wednesday Addams, the ultimate princess of darkness, has grown up and fallen in love with a sweet, smart young man from a respectable family – a man her parents have never met. And if that weren’t upsetting enough, Wednesday confides in her father and begs him not to tell her mother. Now, Gomez Addams must do something he’s never done before – keep a secret from his beloved wife, Morticia. Everything will change for the whole family on the fateful night they host a dinner for Wednesday’s ‘normal’ boyfriend and his parents–secrets are disclosed, relationships are tested, and the Addams family must face up to the one horrible thing they’ve managed to avoid for generations: change.
“Charles Addams kooky, spooky and altogether ooky Addams Family comes to life in this award winning musical comedy”.

Anne of Green Gables
Directed by Amber Langhennig
November 3-5, 10-12, 17-19, 2017
Family Classic
Book by L. M. Montgomery
Play by Sylvia Ashby (Lubbock playwright)

A refreshing, contemporary telling of the classic story. Stern Marilla and her warm-hearted brother Matthew hoped to adopt a boy to work on their farm. But the orphanage sends young, befreckled Anne by mistake, and their lives will never be the same. Her warmth and wit affect everyone around her – even, eventually, the cold Marilla. We follow Anne through her rebellious years, her transformation into a young woman, and her romantic pairing with Gilbert. This play has been charming audiences around the world.
Anne of Green Gables suits community theatre with a varied cast, simple set, and characters familiar to all of us. This version of the novel is concise yet detailed, humorous and bittersweet.”

Blithe Spirit
Directed by Jay C. Brown
February 16-18, 23-25, March 2-4, 2018
An Improbable Farce in Three Acts
Written by Noel Coward

The smash comedy hit of the London and Broadway stages, this much-revived classic from the playwright of Private Lives offers up fussy, cantankerous novelist Charles Condomine, re-married but haunted (literally) by the ghost of his late first wife, the clever and insistent Elvira who is called up by a visiting “happy medium,” one Madame Arcati. As the (worldly and un-) personalities clash, Charles’ current wife, Ruth, is accidentally killed, “passes over,” joins Elvira, and the two “blithe spirits” haunt the hapless Charles into perpetuity.
“Can still keep an audience in a state of tickled contentment”
“A world-class comedy”

The Last Days of Judas Iscariot
Directed by Jim Bush
April 6-8, 13-15, 20-22
Drama
Written by Stephen Adly Guirgis

The Last Days of Judas Iscariot tells the story of a court case over the ultimate Fate of the ultimate back-stabber, Judas Iscariot. Set in a courtroom in Purgatory, The Last Days puts Judas’ case to a hilarious, riotous, piercing trial, the results of which are sure to make the inhabitants of Heaven, Hell, and Purgatory (Mother Teresa, Caiaphas, Saint Monica, Sigmund Freud, and Satan) — and the audience — reconsider what each thought they knew about forgiveness, faith, and the human being inside one of the history’s most infamous figures.
“An extraordinary play…not since Angels in America has there been  a play so unafraid to acknowledge the power of the spirit…”

Ripcord
Directed by Chad Miller
May 4-6, 11-13, 18-20
Comedy
Written by David Lindsey-Abaire

A sunny room on an upper floor is prime real estate in the Bristol Place Senior Living Facility, so when the cantankerous Abby is forced to share her quarters with new-arrival Marilyn, she has no choice but to get rid of the infuriatingly chipper woman by any means necessary. A seemingly harmless bet between the old women quickly escalates into a dangerous game of one-upmanship that reveals not just the tenacity of these worthy opponents, but also deeper truths that each would rather remain hidden.
“A play that flirts with surrealism…but because Lindsey-Abaire writes such good scenes it’s nevertheless heartbreaking and hopeful, suggesting the possibility that, even in old age, people can make choices that may produce a gentler landing.”